Balcom’s Ya Hsien on PEN Translated Poetry Shortlist

Abyss, poems by Ya Hsien 瘂弦, translated by John Balcom (Zephyr Press), has been shortlisted for the 2017 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation.

The $3,000 award recognizes book-length translations of poetry from any language into English published during the current calendar year. The winner will be announced on February 22, 2017 and honored at the PEN America Literary Awards Ceremony on March 27, 2017.

Click on the image for the list of finalists.

Balcom’s Ya Hsien on PEN Translated Poetry Longlist

Abyss, poems by Ya Hsien 瘂弦, translated by John Balcom (Zephyr Press), has been longlisted for the 2017 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation.

The $3,000 award recognizes book-length translations of poetry from any language into English published during the current calendar year. Finalist will be announced on January 18, 2017, with the winner announced on February 22, 2017 and honored at the PEN America Literary Awards Ceremony on March 27, 2017.

Click on the image for the full longlist.

Morse Reviews Balcom’s Xiang Yang

Canaan Morse reviews John Balcom’s translation of Grass Roots: Selected Poems by Xiang Yang 向陽 (Zephyr) for World Literature Today:

Balcom’s ubiquitous preference for merging verbs into adjectival phrases or deleting them entirely strengthens static image and removes dynamic energies that might be considered noisier in English than in Chinese.

And yet the poems are not quiet. They are vividly aware of the aporias and ambiguities inherent in the classical Chinese narrative that iterates time through space, and they speak to them … Balcom’s flexible English represents some of these differences with facility; lines like “A bloody rain falls on fields plowed by bullets” stand apart from lines like “The surprise encounter of the fish and the leaves,” which are brilliant for entirely different reasons. Yet many of his decisions, especially his frequent deletions, seem hard to justify … Balcom’s introduction makes no mention of his process. Translation is frequently maligned as either a derivative act or a violent, domineering one. Perhaps greater transparency could prevent it from being either.

Click on the image for the full review.

John Balcom’s Xiang Yang forthcoming from Zephyr

Grass Roots

Zephyr Press will be publishing Grass Roots, a collection of poems by Taiwanese poet Xiang Yang 向陽, translated by John Balcom.

The so-called “third generation poets,” such as Xiang Yang, Du Ye, and Lo Qing, wanted to see a resurgence of Chinese national and local culture after years of foreign domination. In Taiwan, this revival was complex and multifaceted: the trend toward Westernization in the cultural sphere was subverted by a resurgence of interest in traditional Chinese culture, and political domination by the Kuomintang from the Mainland was opposed by promotion of Taiwanese language and culture. Xiang Yang himself eventually decided to explore two avenues: to write poetry in his native southern Min dialect and to experiment with formalist verse. “I asked myself what made classical poems so enduring,” he says. “It seemed to me that the strict compositional rules and forms of classical poetry contributed greatly to poetic quality.” He began experimenting with forms and rhyme, finally settling on a ten-line poem broken into two quintets as the form most suited to his temperament. It can be said that form made a poet out of him: formal limitations helped to channel and structure the poetic impulse.

Click the image for more information, including ordering.

The Translator Relay: John Balcom

Words without Borders talks to translator of Chinese poetry & fiction John Balcom (Recent publications include Stone Cell by Lo Fu 洛夫 (Zephyr 2012) and Trees without Wind by Li Rui 李锐 (Columbia University Press 2012)). He says:

What I like about translating poetry is that the often brief text allows for focus.  You can keep the entire poem in your head and work on it, fiddling with the words and syntax, the structure and the wordplay.  This is perfect during the academic year – I can work on a translation when I walk to and from the office in the morning and the afternoon.   Classical poetry, as I alluded to earlier, is challenging in the extreme; modern poetry, which is what I have translated a good deal of over the years, is much more doable.  Modern and contemporary Chinese poetry is generally free verse written in the vernacular, which makes for happier results in English.  Short stories and essays are also good during the academic year – I find that if I have to put such texts aside, I can usually pick up where I left off without much trouble. Translating a novel, however, requires stamina, momentum, and uninterrupted focus, which is hard to maintain when I’m teaching.  I find it a bit harder to reconnect with a longer text if I have to put it aside for any length of time.

Click on the image above for the full Q & A.