Interview with Asian Cha’s Tammy Ho Lai-Ming

tammy-ho-lai-ming
Cha: An Asian Literary Journal editor Tammy Ho interviewed in MonkeyBicycle:

Cha is the first Hong Kong-based online literary journal, and it has published many local and expat writers and artists, introducing them to the world’s literary scene. We also act as a general connecting point between writers in the West and writers in Asia, although I must say this distinction, ‘writers in the West and writers in Asia,’ is not in fact that useful and may soon be obsolete, as people, ideas, customs and habits circulate all over the world in an ever more efficient fashion. Of course, sometimes writers in the West may find themselves becoming writers in Asia, and vice versa, either through psychological affiliations or physical journeys.

Over the last six years, we have introduced a number of features that make the journal special. For example, each issue is guest edited by one or two former contributors, who read the submissions with Jeff Zroback (my co-editor) and I, and who help us make the final editorial decisions. This gives each issue a different flavor and tone and fosters a sense of community: the fact that past contributors are happy to return to work with us as guest editors tells us that they like the journal enough to want to continue a relationship with it. This is very heartening. We also hold contests (poetry, flash fiction, critiques) whenever a patron is interested in funding one. We are also in a very good position to publish special issues such as “The China Issue” (July 2011) and “The Ancient Asia Issue” (December 2013), which I hope are useful resources for those who are particularly interested in Asian-themed literature written in or translated into English.

Click the image above for the full interview.

Call for Submissions–The Ancient Asia Issue of CHA

Cha: An Asian Literary Journal is now accepting submissions for “The Ancient Asia Issue,” an edition of the journal devoted exclusively to work from and about Asia before the mid-nineteenth century.
From the beginning of the twentieth century, ancient Asia has contributed to the rebirth and re-imaginations of modern literatures, not only in English (from Ezra Pound to Gary Snyder) but in other western languages as well (Victor Segalen, Octavio Paz, Bertolt Brecht…). “The Ancient Asia Issue” of Cha seeks to revivify this tradition, featuring translations and original works of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and visual art from and about Ancient Asia, to be published in September 2013. If you have something interesting, opinionated, or fresh to say about the Asian past, we would like to hear from you. Please note that we can only accept submissions in English.
We are pleased to announce that Cha former contributor, translator and scholar Lucas Klein will be joining Cha as guest editor for the issue and read the submissions with co-editors Tammy Ho and Jeff Zroback.
The Reviews section will be devoted exclusively to books related to the theme of the issue. If you have a recent book that you think would be right for review in “The Ancient Asia Issue”, we encourage you to contact our Reviews Editor Eddie Tay at eddie@asiancha.com. Books should be sent to Eddie before the end of May 2013.
If you would like to have work considered for “The Ancient Asia Issue”, please submit by email to submissions@asiancha.com by 20th June, 2013. Please include “The Ancient Asia Issue” in the subject line of the email. Submissions to the issue should conform to our guidelines.